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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 26 September 2007 15:25

Cooler Master Hyper 212 - Page 2

Written by Fudzilla staff
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Review: 120mm fan and quad heatpipes

 

Installation requires you to remove your motherboard, something which is always a real pain, but we can understand why this is the case here, since the Intel pushpin design just hasn’t been designed for these kind of weights. CoolerMaster could’ve made a better design for use with AMD coolers though, since the plastic retention bracket should be more than strong enough to hold this cooler.

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Two different types of mounting accessories were supplied, as the one for AMD processors is universal for all sockets. The extra metal bracket you see in the picture is for the optional secondary fan. The instructions are quite easy to follow and Cooler Master has done a good job of translating them into some 20 different languages. In our case we used the LGA-775 mounting brackets and you have to screw in some special screws with reverse threading into the brackets and then attach a foam grommet around each of the screws to prevent any metal from touching the motherboard.

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The next step is to apply the thermal grease onto your CPU and we decided not to use the supplied silver coloured paste that Cooler Master supplied. The reason for this was that we wanted to use the same kind of thermal paste as we’d used with the previous cooler in the system, as to keep things as level as possible during testing. 

Next you pop the cooler on, flip the motherboard over and fit a small plastic grommet to each of the screws and then attach the four nuts with the help of a clever little gadget that Cooler Master supplies. It turns your screwdriver into a socket wrench, which is quite handy and it allows you to tighten the nuts firmly.

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(Page 2 of 3)
Last modified on Friday, 28 September 2007 12:48
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