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Friday, 15 May 2009 05:45

Verizon to offer HP Mini

Written by David Stellmack

Image

1151NR to be $199 after $50 MIR

Verizon is going to join the growing list of carriers that are hoping to break into the cellular mobile data computing market by offering the HP 1151NR Mini netbook. The HP offering will be available from Verizon for $199 after a $50 mail-in-rebate with a two-year mobile broadband contract.

What is a little weird about the Verizon offering is that they are going with a tiered cellular data pricing structure that starts with 250MB per moth for $39.99 all the way up to $59.99 for 5GB per month. Like all of the providers, Verizon is offering no unlimited plan; and the largest plan they will be offering is capped at 5GB per month, with a hefty 10 cents per megabyte if you go over the cap on any plan.

The option of offering netbooks to consumers with cellular data access is attractive for carriers who are looking to boost the amount of offerings to add additional services to drive revenue. Depending on how you look at it, the bandwidth caps do put heavy users in a bad situation and these devices are not well suited for them.

Only time will tell if consumers are attracted to the anywhere data access mobility offered by the cell carriers with these devices. Many users of netbooks complain about the cramped keyboard and lack of other options that leaves them longing for a traditional laptop, but if you are doing some light surfing and some Email this might just be the ticket.
Last modified on Friday, 15 May 2009 06:14
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