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Thursday, 09 April 2009 11:10

Intel says netbooks are not for adults

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Smug toddlers and emerging markets


Intel's senior
vice president and general manager of the Ultra Mobility Group, Anand Chandrasekher, thinks netbooks are not really good for adults, but they are fantastic for kids.

"For a kid, a Netbook is fantastic, as an adult you probably want a notebook. So, there are very simple ways of positioning and thinking about it," said Chandrasekher at IDF Beijing.

Last year Stu Pann, vice president in Intel's sales and marketing group, said the company had originally envisioned netbooks as low-cost products for emerging markets and young kids, but most netbooks are, in fact, ending up with more serious consumers. He also added that a 10-inch screen if "fine for an hour", and it's not something you would like to use on a daily basis.

CNET sees these Intel comments as an attempt to reposition Atom-based netbooks, and we agree. In fact, we already talked about Intel's unwillingness to drop any Atom related restrictions, and we know quite a few people in the company are not happy about well spec'd, stylish netbooks selling for about $500, as Atoms were supposed to be reserved for very affordable low-end products.

It is probably no coincidence that Intel is trying to show the Atom in a slightly different light just weeks before the first CULV-based notebooks start to appear in retail.

More here.
Last modified on Thursday, 09 April 2009 19:38
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