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Monday, 15 October 2007 13:39

16GB iPhone rumors persist

Written by Fudzilla staff

Image

This time complete with grainy pictures

 

Gizmodo has published several pictures of what is supposed to be the rumored 16GB iPhone.

According to the site, the pics were provided by a person claiming to be an AppleStore employee. The rogue salesman claims Apple plans to launch the new version next Tuesday. We beg to differ.

As is the norm in such cases, the "spy" images are horrible, and don't look genuine. The firmware version is 1.1.2, the device shows 14.4GB of free memory, but the real trouble with the pics is not the content but the noise. It looks way too artificial, like nothing produced by a digital camera at high ISO or a mobile phone. It's simply too uniform, almost monochromatic and we can't see any noise reduction smears or artifacts.

We call it a fake, but who knows, we might be wrong. The guys and Gizmodo tried to enhance the images, so some of this might be a byproduct of sharpening and noise reduction filters. Still, it's highly unlikely that you would end up with such noise as a result of filtering.

Here's the link.

Last modified on Friday, 19 October 2007 23:15
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