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Monday, 19 November 2007 10:48

Sun sticks blackbox down a hole

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Best place for it


Sun wants to install one of its portable Blackbox datacentres in an abandoned Japanese coal mine shaft, claiming that such a centre will only use half the electricity.

The centre will use ground water as coolant and the site's temperature is a constant 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit) all year. This will mean there will be no need for air-conditioning outside the containers.

More than $9 million of electricity costs could be saved annually if the centre were to run 30,000 server cores. The abandoned coal mine is located in the Chubu region on Japan's Honshu island. A subterranean datacentre will be easier to secure against unauthorized entry and potential terrorist attacks. The Blackbox containers are robust enough to withstand earthquakes, being capable of withstanding a quake of magnitude 6.7 on the Richter scale.

More here.
Last modified on Tuesday, 20 November 2007 04:58

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