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Friday, 15 August 2008 12:25

Why do people pirate my games?

Written by Nedim Hadzic

Image

The answers are here

 

It was about time someone skipped legal threats and asked a direct question: “Why do people pirate my games?” Cliff Harris decided to find out the reason and he did exactly that – he asked an honest question and got numerous answers, where numerous is apparently mildly put.

Many users named the cost of games as the main culprit, since not everyone is born on the “money tree” and can’t always find $60 to buy a game. Apparently people in Australia are quite unhappy for traditionally higher pricing, but I’m guessing Europeans can’t be too happy, either, as we always pay in euros for what U.S. customers pay in dollars.

Also mentioned is the game quality, as we continue to see more and more technologically advanced but generally crappy games; DRM, the three letters that put in this succession probably make the most hated acronym in digital world; and sheer ease, as you don’t have to walk to the store to download a pirated game.

Well, I myself remember when legal threats began, but it’s tough to catch someone you can’t see. Also, whenever a company would start bragging about a game that’s impossible to crack, half the cracking crews around the world are on it 24/7 until they prove them wrong, so that won’t work, either. Well, I’m guessing that three steps that Mr. Cliff plans to do in order to at least ameliorate this problem might actually prove to be nice guidelines for the rest of the industry.

You can read more here where you’ll also find Mr. Cliff’s conclusion and guidelines.

Last modified on Saturday, 16 August 2008 06:08
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