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Thursday, 16 August 2007 10:59

Other side of the pond to get Killer NIC

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Euroland



Bigfoot Networks
, makers of the Killer Network Interface card, has finally established distribution outside North America. Customers in Europe will finally be able to purchase the Killer NICs through this new distribution channel.

The reputation and reviews of the Killer NIC cards seems to have been mixed over the past several months. Opinions as to the real world benefits of the Killer NIC cards seem to vary, but the cost of these cards when compared with NICs that are integrated into motherboards have made it a tough sell. The unique features are the flexible design of the NIC, which allows applications to be run on the NIC itself, and this continues to be a compelling bonus for users to take the plunge.

Bigfoot is still on track to deliver new versions of their NIC cards which will support the PCIe 1X and 4X connectors in the future; however, no time frame has been given as to when we can expect the new PCIe versions of the card. Unless the performance improves and the cost goes down, it is going to continue to be an uphill battle for Bigfoot.

Like add-in physics card maker Ageia, Bigfoot is also competing for not only a slot on the motherboard, but those additional dollars that gamers sometimes have a difficult time parting with -- unless there is undisputable evidence of vast performance improvement. So far this has been a very elusive thing to establish for both companies.

Last modified on Thursday, 16 August 2007 11:17
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