Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 30 April 2010 12:58

iPhone prototype finder regrets his actions

Written by

Image

Seems like a really nice bloke


The man
who singlehandedly started a chain of events that eventually resulted in a criminal investigation of Gizmodo editors says he's sorry about the mess he helped create.

21-year-old Brian Hogan, who found the prototype iPhone at a Silicon Valley beer garden, claims he tried to return the iPhone to its rightful owner, but that nobody claimed it. His lawyers claim he regrets not doing more to return the phone and argue that he is a nice young man that any parent would be proud of, and we see no reason to disagree.

Hogan's lawyer Jeffrey Bornstein claims Gizmodo mislead his client. “Even though he did obtain some compensation from Gizmodo, Brian thought that it was so that they could review the phone. Brian believed and Gizmodo emphasized to him that there was nothing wrong in sharing the phone with the tech press,” said Bornstein.

Bornstein went on to say that Hogan is involved in a number of humanitarian actions. Apparently he works as a part time swimming instructor at a church community center, he teaches English to Chinese students and he volunteered to teach kids in a Chinese orphanage and plant a friendship garden in Vietnam. Sounds like a great guy, right?

However, we can't but wonder why he didn't contact Apple when he realized he was in possession of a prototype iPhone. It's not that we believe he did anything wrong in selling it to Gizmodo, hell no, but we think Apple would have paid much more than $5,000 to get its precious toy back and get an NDA signed by Hogan. Taking money from Apple is a service to humanity, much like helping Chinese orphans and planting trees in Vietnam, perhaps even better in the eyes of the Almighty.

More here.
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments