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Thursday, 18 March 2010 11:28

Mobile App sales to be $17.5 billion industry

Written by Nick Farell


Image

If you believe that sort of thing


With the
entry of Apple into the mobile market it seems the outfit's marketing and enthusiasm has gotten infectious.

An analyst outfit called Chetan Sharma Consulting has just released a study which claims that there will be $17.5 billion in mobile app sales in 2012. While the world is supposed to end in 2012, it is not likely to be due to the fact that mobile applications sales will bend the fabric of time and space.

We had a look at the report and noticed that it had been commissioned by Getjar, the world's second largest app store. While it is supposed to be independent, it is unlikely that the report would have been released if it did not come up with a rosy view of the mobile app industry. It also dismisses the effect on web based applications because they don't “match the performance of a native app.”

While this is true now, it may not be in 2012. Native third-party app development is Apple's bandwagon while web based software, such as Flash is not. The study insists that HTML 5 will not be ready, but rejects Flash as a player. This is bizarre, and something that only someone who believes that Steve Jobs defines web policy could tout as viable.

Flash is coming to Android phones and it is predicted that this OS, not Apple's iPhone, will be the leading mobile OS by 2012.
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