Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 24 November 2009 12:01

iPhone has a proper virus

Written by Nick Farell

Image

You get that when you are popular


For ages
the fruit themed peddler of electronic toys, Apple has been claiming that its products are built with such wonderful security that they were invulnerable to the outside world. More cynical types pointed out that no virus writer could be bothered getting out of bed to write a virus for an operating system that could only infect three in every 100 computers.

Now that the iPhone has gotten a bit popular it seems that virus writers are taking an interest and are finding it a target which is as easy as a Sunday morning.
The new virus, dubbed "Duh" after a section of its code, also only affects iPhones that have been "jailbroken" so it is unlikely that Apple are going to care that much.

It connects the phone to an "internet control and command centre" in Lithuania that allows hackers surreptitiously to issue commands to the device remotely. It steals online banking passwords and snuffles around the user's SMS messages. People who visit ING's online banking site were directed to a phoney look-alike designed to steal their passwords.The worm also affected Australians using the Optus network but it was unclear how many had been infected so far.

It is a bit tricky that the only symptom of the infection is a severe reduction in battery life as iPhones tend to go through batteries quite quickly at the best of times.


blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments