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Friday, 22 May 2009 11:08

Ultrascan recreates financial heist with Nokia 1100

Written by Nedim Hadzic

Image

Easy as 50 69 65

 
Nonbelievers in Nokia 1100’s hacking potential will surely be turned into believers, in case that the sudden jump in value didn’t turn them already. Now a fraud investigation firm Ultrascan has recreated how one would go about such a feat.

The firm reprogrammed one of the 1100 phones to receive other phone’s SMS, thus enabling it to receive other phone’s mobile transaction authentication number. Of course, this works only in countries that use mTANs, such as Germany, Holland, etc.

Next step would be to obtain that account name and password, but that would probably be even simpler in the time we’re living in, with the fake websites and users clicking on whatever will let them peek under some famous person’s skirt for a couple of measly bucks.

Note that the hacking potential is only true if the unit is made at Bochum, Germany, so if you have yours in the attic somewhere, be sure to check before you go and sell it. (We are not advocating crime here. sub.ed.)

More here.

Last modified on Friday, 22 May 2009 11:54
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