Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 11 May 2009 11:52

T-Mobile supports hacked iPhones

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Even if unblessed by Apple


T-Mobile
has been handed the award for the telco most likely to miff Steve Jobs by fixing a problem which resulted in the iPhone not working properly on its network.

The iPhone is not supposed to work with T-Mobile's network as the Mighty Steve Jobs has ordered that they should only work on networks he says it should.  Since users don't like being told where they have to buy their services from, many of them have used jail breaking software and run the phone on what ever network they like. The Consumerist recently posted an article detailing a customer's experience after a recent T-Mobile "system update."

Apparently the problem caused some serious issues with the illegal iPhones and meant that users sent blank text messages or even shedloads of texts whenever a voice message was received.  This often cost the users cash. No-one really expects T-Mobile to respond, however the company quickly said that it was working on a fix, but it might take them six months.  In fact it only took them a few days and the result was posted on a Hackintosh forum.

Magazines like Arstechnica have been praising T-Mobile for its PR coup saying that the outfit had overperformed on is customer service. We suspect that Apple on the other hand have been seething.
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments