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Wednesday, 13 August 2008 10:53

Apple iPhone faults poor design

Written by Nick Farell

Image

All in the chipset


Problems
punters have been having with Apple's so-called technical marvel, the iPhone, might come down to having a shonky chipset under the bonnet.

Despite claims that Apple's build quality is second to none, it seemed that the fruit-themed toymaker thought it would be a wizard idea to install an immature Infineon chipset. According to Nomura analyst, Richard Windsor, some iPhone users are having trouble getting a 3G connection and hanging on to it.

These problems are typical of an immature chipset and radio protocol stack, where we are almost certain Infineon is the 3G supplier. The problems are likely to be embedded in the low-level software and the chipset, a firmware upgrade from Apple is unlikely to fix the problems.

Not that Apple appears to want to.  So far, its policy has been to try and blame its partner, AT&T, despite the fact that that the problem appears to be worldwide.

More here.
Last modified on Thursday, 14 August 2008 03:27
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