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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 31 October 2007 10:02

$100 laptop is not a myth

Written by Nedim Hadzic

money.jpg

But its price certainly is!

 

After a 700,000 unit order by Pakistan's Allama Iqbal Open University, Intel and Microsoft are going to supply Libya with 150,000 laptops that are designed for basic use and needs of children in developing countries that cost US$200 to produce. However, the actual Libyan price for these has not yet been disclosed.

The laptops are sold by Intel and branded as the Classmate PC, but further details, such as the OS of choice, are not yet known. However, the notebooks are reported to support both Linux and Windows.

OLPC (One Laptop Per Child), on the other hand, is struggling to get concrete orders. Apparently, shaking hands with government officials doesn't quite mean they will purchase the laptops.

Still, the first order of 100,000 laptops was placed by Uruguay's Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay, and the folks from OLPC call it a good start.

However, this was supposed to be a $100 laptop: what happened to its price? Apparently, the production costs have risen and now the cost of producing one is about US$188. I guess it's still under $100 if they intend to supply one laptop per every two children. Mighty generous, don't you think? (Caution, heavy sarcasm intended).

 

More about Intel and Microsoft laptops here, and OLPC laptops here.

 

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:52

Nedim Hadzic

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