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Tuesday, 30 October 2007 12:13

900 Seagate employees get the axe

Written by David Stellmack

Image

One Northern Ireland plant to be closed


Seagate
has announced that it will be eliminating 1.5 percent of the company’s workforce with the closing of one of its two Northern Ireland plants. Over 900 employees will lose their jobs as part of this plant closing.

According to Seagate, the plant in Limavady in County Derry produces the substrate material that is used on the platters within hard drives. The plant is over ten years old and Seagate has expanded its substrate manufacturing capabilities in both Malaysia and Singapore. Those factors, coupled with lower prices from third party manufacturers, have made this a necessary step in Seagate’s continuing effort to streamline its operational overhead, according to the company.

Seagate’s second plant, located in Springtown County Londonderry, which is also in Northern Ireland, will not be affected by the closing of the Limavady plant. According to Seagate, the Limavady plant is no longer able to compete from a business standpoint due to changes in the market. The Springtown plant produces recording-head components that are used in hard drives. While some employees from the Limavady plant hope to be able to find work in the Springtown plant, it is currently unknown if Seagate will be adding jobs to the Springtown plant.

Last modified on Tuesday, 30 October 2007 18:43

David Stellmack

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