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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 18 October 2007 11:37

Predict the unpredictable

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$2.2 million software


A University of Arizona Professor, Jerzy Rozenblit, has received a $2.2 million grant to design software that will predict the outcome of political and military situations. The idea is that the software will predict the actions of paramilitary groups, ethnic factions, terrorists and criminal groups.

It could also be used in finance, law enforcement, epidemiology areas and the aftermath of natural disasters, such as hurricane Katrina.

The Asymmetric Threat Response and Analysis Project (ATRAP), is a collection of algorithms that consider social, political, cultural, military and media influences. It can handle data loads that would overwhelm human analysts and look at the data, rather than any human cultural biases.

More here.
Last modified on Friday, 19 October 2007 07:03

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