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Thursday, 27 March 2008 19:24

AMD launches energy efficient Phenom 9100e

Written by Nermin Hajdarbegovic

Image

First 65W desktop quad-core


Apart
from the regular Quad-core Phenoms, AMD has launched an energy efficient 65W part designated Phenom X4 9100e. You probably remember AMD's Sempron EE and Athlon BE series of energy efficient CPUs; in fact, the Athlon BE is still the most energy efficient dual-core desktop CPU on the market.

The new 9100e gets an "e" suffix instead, and it's rated at 65W, unlike the plain Phenoms which suck up to 95W or 125W in higher clocked models. This is a B2 stepping part, it's clocked 1.8GHz, while the voltage is 1.10~1.15v. It's nice to see AMD is targeting this market segment, if only we could figure out which market segment this is supposed to be.

Energy efficient server parts make sense, and both Intel and AMD have quad-core server parts rated well below 65W. Low-end CPUs for office and home use, such as the EE and BE parts mentioned earlier also make sense. But a desktop quad-core, well, not really. Diesel powered Aston Martin, anyone? Sarcasm aside, it will probably be the cheapest quad-core out there and that's what really makes it interesting, forget the TDP.
Last modified on Friday, 28 March 2008 09:35
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