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Friday, 21 September 2007 11:37

Solar technology powers Wi-Fi routers

Written by David Stellmack
Image

New use for solar energy


Solis Energy, a small U.S. start-up company, has announced it has created technology that can run Wi-Fi routers in remote places using only solar power. 

Solis claims it has created a Solar Power Plant that is capable of supplying 12, 24 and 48 volts of DC power for use in stand-alone applications such as surveillance cameras and outdoor Wi-Fi. 

The Solar Power Plant is actually just one large solar panel connected to a generator unit that Solis claims can power such applications devices for up to seven days, even without available sunlight to recharge the batteries. The large solar panel stores power during daylight hours for use at night.

The company claims it also has a separate "tap adaptor" that can be used to provide 120 volts of AC power from street lights to Wi-Fi, WiMAX and other outdoor systems; it also claims that is has created an “outdoor UPS” that can provide solar-generated battery backup for municipal Wi-Fi and other critical infrastructure. 

Solis also claims that use of its products can make Wi-Fi available in places that are far away from mainstream power sources.

Read more here.

Last modified on Friday, 21 September 2007 12:09

David Stellmack

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