Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 13 January 2009 11:19

Lucid can scale with 2 GPUs close to linear

Written by Fuad Abazovic
Rate this item
(0 votes)

ImageImage

Chips in 2H 2009

 

We had an interesting meeting with the president and CIO of Lucid, a company that gained a lot of attention at IDF 2008. Lucid promises a small chip that can make your two GPU scale almost linear. After a long discussion we learned that Linear is almost linear, and that linear is best case scenario and that real world performance should be close to linear.

This would mean that two GPUs, let's say in SLI or Crossfire, powered by Lucid chip and driver, could score close to 100 percent faster than a single GPU. Let's say that if a single GPU would score 100 FPS in one game, two would score close to 200FPS.

The chips that will find their place in both motherboards and graphics cards will appear on the market in 2H 2009. The prototypes are already finished, but the company didn't want to talk about any specific partners. 

Anyone who has a PLX chip that makes two cards run together could be Lucid’s potential customer, and obviously some guys are interested. This leaves a lot of unclear questions to be answered, as we suspect that both ATI and Nvidia might have something against a chip that makes SLI and Crossfire look like child's play, and that this could lead to a driver that will block Lucid’s ability to shine.

We don’t want to talk about moral dilemmas, but we suspect that this might be the case. Lucid promised to show us a demo in the near future and we believe that Intel is keeping an eye on Lucid for its Larrabee school science project.

Last modified on Tuesday, 13 January 2009 11:24
Fuad Abazovic

Fuad Abazovic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments